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Martha's Vineyard Surfcasters
Martha's Vineyard
Surfcasters Association
P.O. Box 3053
Edgartown, MA 02539
Author: Created: 7/6/2011 7:37 PM RssIcon
Another MVSA Blog by Dave
By dbalon on 1/19/2014 11:20 AM
The new OB Fishing Pier is now in the final stages of completion. The main decking is almost complete and the safety railings are being installed. The handicap ramp to the pier is also completed now.

Take a look at some new photos provided by Wally White. Simply click on the link below and then view the latest pictures in the photo album. The latest pictures posted are at the end of the photo album.

Click here to view the latest photos of the OB Fishing Pier.
By dbalon on 1/19/2014 10:14 AM
Thanks to Ron for the latest update on the changing conditions on Chappy and Wasque Point. The two photos are showing a new sand bar off the Chappy shore and the latest condition of Wasque.
 
Ron reports the following:

"It's a view of the new sand bar that built and runs parallel to the Chappy shoreline. The point in the picture is less than a Hammer cast away."

"This is a shot of Wasque Point from the eastern end of the Chappy bathing beach. Wasque is about 200 yds. away"

Open the Word document directly below to see the photos.


Chappy-Wasque 011814.doc
By dbalon on 1/8/2014 4:41 PM
The latest edition of the MVSA Newletter is now out. All of the latest updates are included such as Business updates, Events, Meetings etc...

The MVSA Newsletter is enclosed for your enjoyment.

MVSA Newsletter JAN 2014.pdf
By dbalon on 1/8/2014 4:16 PM

Check out our first shot of using a GoPro camera with a kite for aerial photography! Our educators braved the frigid temperatures on Norton Point this morning to test out the rig, which will be used to monitor the breach. Stay tuned for more GoPro action!

Click here to see the awesome aerial photo of the Breach!
By dbalon on 1/6/2014 3:50 PM

Property Status Update:
Last week's storm did a great job of cleaning and smoothing the beaches! This photo was taken a few hours ago on East Beach, Chappy. It's pretty foggy but the seas are beginning to subside
.
Cape Poge Wildlife Refuge was re-opened for OSV's at 1 PM. The northern beachfront of Leland Beach is also now open, however the southern beachfront at Leland remains closed due to ...overwashing up to the dunes. Norton Point Beach also remains closed today with high surf conditions overwashing the eastern half of the beach. We will reassess the situation at both Leland and Norton Point on Tuesday and make a decision to open or not based on current conditions.

Many of the interior OSV trails at Cape Poge and Leland are still heavily clogged with ice and flooding conditions. Remember: If in doubt, don't go out!

Click here to see the article and photo.


By dbalon on 1/6/2014 3:28 PM
All sides weigh in on beach access during plover nesting



ORLEANS — Local officials and others interested in beach access believe they may have regulations in place by the summer that would reduce the amount of time vehicles are prohibited from off-road trails in Orleans and Chatham because of nesting shorebirds.

The new rules would allow vehicles to bypass nests and possibly lone chicks that, because of current guidelines, required the beaches to be closed to off-road access for much of the summer this past year.

Click here to read the full article.

By dbalon on 12/20/2013 3:43 PM
The new Oak Bluffs Fishing Pier is almost completed. This is a great accomplishment for all islanders and visitors to enjoy! Check out the recently added photos to the OB Fishing Pier photo album under the PHOTOS tab on this website. Special thanks go out to Wally White for providing the latest photos and keeping us up to date on the progress.  

The pier looks great!

There are now over 50 pictures with captions showing the timeline of the fishing pier being built.

Check them out here at the direct link to the photo album.
By dbalon on 12/20/2013 1:22 PM

As Breach Retreats, Erosion Picks Up Speed

Vinyeard Gazette
December 19, 2013
Tom Dunlop

Barely five months after the Schifter home on Chappaquiddick was moved back from a rapidly eroding bluff, dramatic changes are taking place again at Wasque where the Norton Point breach continues to have a mind of its own. The breach has retreated 800 feet since late September and as a result, the surf and tides have all but claimed the only other house standing along the same length of the Chappy shoreline, owned by Jerry and Sue Wacks of Lexington.

Read the entire article by clicking here.

By dbalon on 11/9/2013 9:42 AM

For Immediate Release: 11/8/2013

Contact:

Roger Fleming, Earthjustice, (978) 846-3612

Capt. Paul Eidman, Anglers Conservation Network, (732) 922-4077

Louis DeRicco, Gateway Striper Club, (516) 578-7428

 Fishermen Sue National Fisheries Service to Protect River Herring and Shad from Industrial Trawlers
Recent decision to kill new plan violated federal law

Washington, DC – Recreational fishing groups have filed a lawsuit in the D.C. District Court challenging a decision by the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) to terminate a plan to protect river herring and shad in the Atlantic Ocean.

Last June, the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council initiated an amendment (Amendment 15) to a fisheries management plan known as the Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fishery Management Plan to recover depleted river herring (Alewife and Blueback) and shad (American and Hickory) populations.  Serious concerns had been raised by scientists, managers, fishermen, conservation groups, and other members of the public because hundreds of thousands of river herring and shad are caught and killed in the mackerel, squid and butterfish fishery without any management plan or meaningful regulatory protections.  Coast wide, populations of these fish have dwindled to historically low levels.  Unfortunately, in October 2013, the Council and NMFS voted to terminate development of Amendment 15 and instead voted to establish a multi-year study group designed to operate outside of the legal mandates for U.S. fisheries management.

Earthjustice represents New Jersey-based Anglers Conservation Network and Captain Paul Eidman, New York’s Gateway Striper Club, and Massachusetts Herring Warden Philip Lofgren in this matter.

Industrial fishing boats drag nets as wide as a football field often catching tens-of-thousands of pounds of non-targeted species in a single net tow.  As the industrial fishing fleet grew during the 1990s, fisheries scientists documented a dramatic decline in forage fish like river herring and shad.

“Without healthy forage fish populations, the entire ocean ecosystem unravels,” said Captain Paul Eidman of the Anglers Conservation Network.

“The Magnuson-Stevens Act is crystal clear that all fish stocks requiring conservation must be included in a fishery management plan that will bring them to recovery,” said Roger Fleming, Attorney at Earthjustice.  “Sadly, fisheries managers entrusted with assuring the health of America’s fish for all types of fishermen and the public, decided to punt on first down.” 

“In the past 15 years, striped bass anglers along the Atlantic coast have witnessed the depletion firsthand,” said Captain Eidman.  “Just like our fathers and grandfathers did each spring, surf fishermen would head to a local spillway, dip a net down into thousands of river herring, grab a few for bait, run to the beach and live line them for big bass. Now you are lucky to see even a single herring in the same spots.  It’s no accident that this decline coincides with the introduction of super-efficient pair trawl ships off our coastlines.  The practice of dumping incidental catch overboard at sea is insane and has to be monitored and stopped.”

“We joined this lawsuit in an effort to support the conservation of forage fish, which are critical to the health of a striped bass fishery that we are very passionate about,” said Louis DeRicco from the Gateway Striper Club. “If the largely unregulated harvest of river herring and shad is allowed to continue it threatens the future of the Atlantic Coast striped bass population that is already in decline.”

River herring and shad are vitally important forage fish in the ocean ecosystem.  As “anadromous” species that spawn in rivers but spend the majority of their life cycle at sea, they play a critical role in the biology of rivers, estuaries and ocean waters along the Atlantic seaboard as prey, or “forage”, for many species of fish, birds, and marine mammals.  These species include striped bass, weakfish, bluefish, bluefin tuna, marlin, sharks, ospreys, loons, herons, bald eagles, egrets, kingfishers, harbor seals, porpoises, whales, and river otters.  River herring and shad are particularly critical to striped bass because in the spring when river herring and shad swim up the coast and enter into freshwater rivers, striped bass follow feeding on them en route to their own spawning grounds.

“Public comment favoring this amendment was 37,000 in favor to one against,” said Fleming.  “Regional Administrator John Bullard, Council Member Lee Anderson of Delaware, and Jeff Kaelin of New Jersey’s Lund’s fisheries, who led the charge to kill this amendment, should be held accountable for their actions.  Political pressure brought by the industrial trawl industry should not be allowed to trump the recovery of one of the keystone species upon which so much of the entire East Coast fishing industry and related business depends.”

Read the complaint filed today here: http://earthjustice.org/documents/legal-document/pdf/amd-15-complaint

--------------

Brian Smith
Campaign Manager

50 California Street, Suite 500

San Francisco, CA 94111

T: 415.217.2014

F: 415.217.2040

earthjustice.org

 

facebook.com/earthjustice

twitter.com/earthjustice

 

 

 

Because the earth needs a good lawyer

By dbalon on 11/2/2013 8:40 AM
Lure Entrereneur Grows Business to Meet Growing International Demand

MV Times
Barry Stringfellow
October 30, 2013

If you see a slightly built man with a shock of red hair, surfcasting into gale force winds this winter, don't take pity on him — he's not a fisherman driven around the bend by cabin fever, or a clueless novice. He's Peter Johnson, owner and CEO of Roberts Lures, and he's out doing some R & D for his rapidly growing business.

Read the entire article by clicking here.

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